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WELCOME to KEVEREL CHESS

Welcome to the Keverel Chess website, which will be covering all chess matters relating to Exmouth and Exmouth players, whether played or written in the town or further afield.

In addition, there will be a selection of chess books available to discriminating collectors. Lists will be updated regularly and enquiries about books listed may be e-mailed.

Introduction

Here are some short biographies of chessplayers who have made above-average contributions to chess at some level, whether in Devon or further afield.

The 1st editions of some of these articles got their first airing on the chessdevon website, and the author is grateful to its webmaster for that opportunity. These early ones have now all been reviewed and updated where new information has come to light before posting here.

Copyright remains with the author who will be pleased to receive further information for inclusion, or make corrections where necessary. Family history researchers should contact the author in the first instance with a view to a possible useful exchange of information.

Introduction to Exmouth Chess Club

Weekly Chess Column.

The Plymouth-based Western Morning News carries one of the oldest chess columns in any provincial daily paper. It was started in 1891 and has continued ever since in one form or another, in spite of having shifted for a short spell to another title in the same stable, the Illustrated Western Weekly News.

For the past 55 years it has had just three correspondents: J. E. “Eddy” Jones (1956 – 63); K. J. “Ken” Bloodworth (1963 – 1999) & R. H. “Bob” Jones from 1999.

For all this time, it has reported weekly on the chess activities within its readership’s area, Devon & Cornwall, However, since December 2010, in a cost-cutting exercise and rationalisation, the WMN joined forces with its Northcliff Group neighbour, the Bristol-based Western Daily Press, to produce a weekend supplement in common, called Westcountry Life. Fortunately, they retained the chess column, which means it now gets a much wider readership, and this must be reflected in the scope of what it records. So the activities in Somerset and Gloucestershire must get equal billing, as it were, with those of Devon & Cornwall.

One must hope this experiment will prove successful and continue. We hope chess followers will purchase the two papers in question, at least their Saturday edition, as this is the point of the exercise. However, I have permission to reproduce it on this website for the benefit of those outside the readership area.

To that end, I aim to post it here a day or two after its appearance in the paper.

Bob Jones

Current Entries In the Royal Beacon Seniors Congress 20.10.17.

Announcement:

Robert Everson has been one of our most regular competitiors in the Seniors Congress from the start, one of significant contingent coming each year from Kent.

This year, he was, as usual, one of the 1st entries in, but then I was told he was ill, and a little later, that he would be too ill to play. Now I’m told he has been diagnosed with an inoperable brain tumour, and has been hospitalised.

I’m sure all our thoughts go to him and his family & friends.

I don’t know if he’s able to receive messages or e-mails, but his address is bobeversonq@gmail.com.

Beacon Seniors’ Congress 2017

Royal Beacon Hotel – Exmouth

Mon. 6th – Fri. 10th Nov.

Entries so far

Date: 20th Oct.

17 days to go

Seniors 65+

1 202 Stephen Berry Wimbledon
2 194 Ken Norman Wokingham
3 181 Ivan Myall Chelmsford
4 180 Norman Hutchinson Cambridge
5 172 Robert Everson    ill Dartford
6 169 Adrian Pickersgill Hastings
7 163 Bill Ingham Teignmouth
8 162 Ian McAllan Sidcup
9 161 Brian Valentine Leighton B.
10 159 Brian Gosling E. Budleigh
11 154 Andrew Price Leamington
12 153 Raymond Gamble Derby
13 152 David Openshaw Cavendish
14 152 Arthur Hibbitt Banbury
15 150 Martin Page Insurance
16 147 Mike Wiltshire Kent
17 142 Ivor Annetts Tiverton
18 138 Paul Foster Medway
19 136 Malcolm Roberts Holmes Chapel
20 133 Dinah Norman Wokingham
21 132 Ray Kearsley Wimbledon
22 131 Michael Cresswell Barking
23 131 Gerald Naldrett Gerrards Cross
24 130 Peter Lucas Sussex
25 130 Robert Hurn Caerphilly
26 129 Alan Sherriff Bexley
27 129 Stan Lovell BCA
28 128 William Harris Sidmouth
29 128 Robert Jones Exmouth
30 123 Paul Errington Bournemouth
31 123 Ray Hunt Seaton
32 119 Roger Waters BCA
33 119 Philip Gordon BCA
34 119 Malcolm Belt Exmouth
35 117 Omer Namouk Hastings
36 112 David Burt Bournemouth
37 102 Sid Jones Dorchester
38 96 Peter Carrick Bath
39 93 Hazel Welch Seaton
40 91 Marian Cox Southampton
41 81 Reg Cox Southampton

“Juniors”  50 – 64

1 197 Graham Bolt Exeter
2 191 Mike Waddington Dorchester
3 188 Steve Dilleigh Bristol
4 188 Jonathan Wells Norwich
5 185 Ian Heppell Wimbledon
6 173 Alan Brown Northampton
7 169 Tim Spanton Hastings
8 167 Ronnie Burton Weymouth
9 163 Robert Stern Pimlico
10 161 Steve Dean Seaton
11 157 Phil Kennedy Cornwall
12 155 Colin Sellwood Camborne
13 152 Nigel Livesey Manchester
14 146 Jamie Morgan Cornwall
15 132 Ian Blencowe Gloucester
16 130 Paul Jackson Bournemouth
17 120 Susan Selley Exmouth
18 116 Graham Hillman Wimbourne
19 96 William Taplin Keynsham

Name in Yellow

= Most recent entry

Success For Torquay Schoolboys (14.10.2017.) 955

Last weekend saw an International Schools Team Tournament at Millfield School, Somerset, in which the Devon representative was Torquay Boys’ Grammar School. The format involved all schools playing 2 preliminary rounds, on the basis of which teams were allocated to the Championship or Major Section for the 5 subsequent rounds.

Having lost their older and more experienced players to tertiary education, Torquay had a younger team than usual and just failed to qualify for the top section, but were well-placed in the Major. Their team comprised the following players, with their final scores out of 7.

Bd. 1: Vignesh Ramesh (3). 2. Ben Sturt (3½). 3. Jakub Kubiac (3½). 4. Ben Sanders-Watt (3½). 5. Luke Glasson (6½). 6. Isaac Kennedy-Bruyneels (6). 7. Toby O’Donoghue (3½). 8.Oliver Mortimer (2½). 9. Evan McMullan (5½). 10 Kiernan Raine (6). 11. James Gibbs (4½) & 12. Surinder Virdee (5½).

Luke, Isaac, Evan, Kieran and Surinder all won prizes for the Best Board performance.

The final school positions in the Major were as follows: 1st TBGS. 2nd Chepstow School. 3rd St. Benildus College, Dublin. 4th St. Andrews College, Dublin. 5th Colaiste Eanna (Dublin ‘A’). 6th Colaiste Eanna (Dublin) ‘B’.

The Championship Section finished as follows: 1st Gonzaga College (Dublin) ‘A’. 2nd Royal GS. Guildford. 3rd Millfield. 4th Winchester. 5th Q.E. School, Barnet & Gonzaga College ‘B’.

The very strong Isle of Man tournament ended a few days ago, with a victory for World Champion, Carlsen. The draw for Rd. 1 was done randomly, which was lucky for some, like Carlsen and Adams who were drawn against much weaker opponents, while the much closer seeds, Caruana and Kramnik were paired together. Here is Adams’ first game.

White: M. Adams (2738). Black:  V. Bianco (2086).

Caro-Kann – Arkell-Khenkin Variation [B12]

1.e4 c6 2.d4 d5 3.e5 c5 The Arkell-Khenkin Variation, pioneered by our local player and Russian ex-pat Igor Khenkin. Although a 2nd move by the same piece in the opening would seem to be bad, both had successes with it and pioneered its use. 4.Nf3 cxd4 5.Nxd4 Nc6 6.Nxc6 bxc6 7.Bd3 Ba6 8.e6 fxe6 9.0–0 Bxd3 10.cxd3 g6 11.Bf4 Bg7 12.Qe2 Nf6 13.Nd2 Nh5 14.Be5 0–0 15.Nf3 Bxe5 16.Nxe5 An excellent outpost for the knight. 16…c5 17.g3 Qd6 18.Rac1 Rac8 19.Rfe1 Ng7 20.h4 Rf5 21.b4 Rc7 22.bxc5 Rxc5 23.d4 Rc7 24.Qd2 Rf8 25.Rxc7 Qxc7 26.Rc1 Qb7 27.g4 Ne8 28.Qe3 Nc7 29.h5 Kg7 30.hxg6 hxg6 31.Nd7 Rc8 Completing the desertion of their king by Black’s pieces. 32.Qg5 Threatening e5 and e7. 0–1 Analysis shows that 1…Rf8, although losing the rook is the only move to avoid a quicker forced mate. 1–0

In last week’s position played out in Manchester in 1929, after 1.RxB QxR there followed 2.Ng5 threatening both the queen and Rxh7 mate, so 2…Qg6 is forced, but White continues with 3.RxP+ QxR and 4.Nf7+ is what is called a smothered mate – probably the move that Black overlooked when he originally accepted the “gift”.

In this position White has a move that wins significant material.

White to play

S. Devon Chess Festival Details (07.10.2017.) 954

The South Devon Chess Festival starts in exactly one month’s time when the 18th Royal Beacon Seniors Congress starts on Monday 6th November at Exmouth. This will consist of a game a day throughout the week, finishing on Friday afternoon and giving everyone who wishes to partake in both just enough time to get down to the Livermore House Hotel, Torquay, where the 51st Torbay Congress will start at 7 p.m. that evening. This will provide players with 10 games in 7 days. For more details about the Seniors event, contact the Organiser by e-mail at jones_r53@sky.com, and for the Torbay Congress contact Phil McConnell on secretary@torbaycongress.com. Downloadable entry forms for both events may be found on several local websites including chessdevon.org.

In last year’s Seniors event, Andrew Footner mistook the start time of Rd. 1 and was defaulted, which meant he had to pull out all the stops in his remaining games, which he did winning all 4 and coming 2nd=.

White: M. Dow. Black: A. F. Footner.

Scandinavian Defence [B01]

1.e4 d5 Signature move of the Scandinavian Defence, immediately asking a question of White. 2.exd5 the most usual answer. Black now has to choose whether to retake immediately, the Main Line, in which case his queen will be attacked, or to leave it for the time being and build up an attack against it.  2…Nf6 3.d4 Bg4 4.Be2 Bxe2 5.Qxe2 Qxd5 6.Nf3 Nc6 7.c3 0–0–0 8.Be3 e5 9.dxe5 Nxe5 10.0–0 Bd6 11.Nbd2 Rhe8 12.Rfd1 Nd3 13.Nf1 Bf8 14.Qc2 a6 15.Bd4 c5 16.Bxf6 gxf6 17.Ne3 Qe4 18.Rd2 Bh6 19.Ne1 Nxf2! Black wins a pawn as Whte’s knight is triple attacked. 20.Rxd8+ Rxd8 21.Qxe4 Nxe4 22.Nf5 Bf4 23.Nf3 Ng5 24.N5h4 Rd6 25.Re1 Re6 Black is trying very hard to get his f-pawns undoubled. 26.Kf1 Kc7 27.Re2 Rxe2 28.Kxe2 Kd6 Black’s king now sets off on an 11 move odyssey. 29.c4 Ke6 30.Kd3 h5 31.b3 Nxf3 32.Nxf3 Kf5 33.h3 Be5 34.Ng1 Bb2 35.Nf3 Kf4 36.Ke2 Kg3 37.Kf1 f5 38.Ng1 Be5 39.Ne2+ Kh2 40.Kf2 f4 41.Kf3 h4 42.Nc1 Kg1 43.Nd3 Bd6 44.Nc1 If White tried to win a pawn with 44.Nxf4 there follows 44…Bxf4 45.Kxf4 Kxg2 46.Kg4 f5+ 47.Kxf5 Kxh3 and the h-pawn will queen, so the knight is reduced to impassivity. 44…Kf1 45.Nd3 f6 46.Nc1 Ke1 47.Nd3+ Kd2 48.Nb2 Kc2 49.Na4 b5 50.cxb5 axb5 51.Nb6 Kb2 0–1 White resigned, fearing his pawns would be gobbled up, but the position was perhaps less clear than that. e.g. 52.a4 Kxb3 53.axb5 c4 threatening to break away. 54.Nxc4 Kxc4 55.Kg4 Kd5 As the bishop covers the b8 queening square, the king needs to come across asap. 56.Kxh4 Ke5 57.b6 Kf5 58.Kh5 Ke4 59.Kh4 and it’s still unclear.

In last week’s position, Mrs. Hogg played 1.f7+ forcing 1…Rxf7 and allowing 2.Rh8 mate.

In this position from a game c. 100 years ago, in an attempt to break through Black’s well set up defences, White offered the sacrifice of the exchange with 1.RxB, an offer Black considered and then accepted. Was he wise to do so?

WECU Jamboree Results (23.09.2017.)

The West of England Jamboree took place on Sunday at the Kenn Centre, next to the A38. Five teams of 12 players took part, in a format that guarantees each team has 6 whites and 3 of their players will face one of the other 4 teams. Cornwall, Somerset and Gloucestershire entered teams, while Devon, being the home side and currently possessing plenty of chess talent, entered a 1st & 2nd team.

Most pairings were closely enough matched in strength to make their games long and well-contested.

It was, perhaps, no great surprise that Devon A came 1st with 9½/12 points, followed by Somerset (7 pts); Cornwall (5); Devon B (4½) and Gloucestershire (4). The complex results chart and some photographs may be found on keverelchess.com while games may be found on chessdevon.org.

The event was organised by Mark Hassall of the Carrick Club, and his game bore a striking resemblance to the one he played at last year’s jamboree, and printed here at the time.

White: M. Hassall (168). Black: P. O’Neill (188).

Sicilian Defence – Najdorf Var. [B99]

1.e4 c5 2.Nf3 d6 3.d4 cxd4 4.Nxd4 Nf6 5.Nc3 a6 6.Bg5 e6 7.f4 Last year his opponent played 7…e5 in order to free up his white square bishop, an idea that didn’t work. 7…Be7 Subsequent moves will vary in detail from a year ago but are very much following the same plans. 8.Qf3 Qc7 9.0–0–0 Nbd7 10.g4 b5 11.Bxf6 gxf6 12.f5 Nc5 13.a3 Rb8 14.Bh3 b4 15.axb4 Rxb4 16.g5 Qa5? A loss of tempo, in view of 17.Nc6 Qb6 If Black had pressed ahead with 17…Qa1+ there would follow 18.Kd2 Qxb2 19.Rb1 Nb3+ 20.Ke1 Qxc2 21.Nxb4 winning the queen. 18.Nxb4 Qxb4 19.fxe6 Nxe6 20.gxf6 Bf8 21.Rhg1 Qc5 22.e5 dxe5 23.Qa8 h5 24.Bxe6 fxe6 25.Ne4 Qc7 26.Nd6+ Bxd6 27.Rxd6! Qc4 1-0 and Black resigned as White has several lines ending in mate, the most direct being  28.Rc6 hitting queen and bishop.

Here is an instructive miniature from the same tournament.

White: C. J. Scott (160). Black: A. Champion (147).

Alekhine’s Defence [B03]

1.e4 Nf6 Alekhine’s Defence, in which Black tries to lure Black’s pawns forward to a point where they become unstable and can be more easily attacked, as White will by then have neglected his piece development. 2.e5 Nd5 3.d4 d6 4.f4 dxe5 5.fxe5 Nc6 6.c4 Nb6 7.Be3 Bf5 8.Nf3 e6 9.Nc3 Qd7 10.Be2 0–0–0 11.Qd2 Be7 12.0–0–0 Nb4 13.a3 Nc2 Black has succeeded in getting in behind White’s front lines 14.c5 But the White pawns press ahead anyway. 14…Nxe3 15.cxb6 Nxd1?? Black sees only the chance of going a whole rook up, but completely overlooks his defences. 16.bxa7 c5 17.a8Q+ Kc7 18.Qa5+ 1–0.

In last week’s position White won simply with 1. QxR+. If 1…KxQ 2.Rh3# or 1…Kg8 2,RxP+ etc.

Here we have a bit of Tal magic from 35 years ago, as fresh today as the day it was created. He is looking for a quick finish before White can start to exploit his

vulnerable back rank. Any ideas?

Black to play and win quickly

WECU Chess Jamboree (17.09.2017.)

The West of England Chess Union’s annual Jamboree was held on Sunday 17th September, at a new venue, called the Kenn Centre, adjacent to the A38 near the foot of Haldon Hill in Devon. This was designed to make it a little easier for the Cornish players to get there, although it’s still a good distance from Truro.

This year there was no Graded Section, but Devon used their more numerous troops to form a 1st team from the best 12 avaialble players, and a 2nd team from the next best dozen. This latter team used up some of the players who would in earlier years have formed the basis of a grade-limited team.

The Centre proved to be an excellent venue for the event, being modern in construction, with large playing hall, analysis room, kitchen facilities and ample parking. It will be surely used again at some point for chess events.

The Organiser, Mark Hassall, (standing centre) having enjoyed a quick win, takes time to monitor the progress of his Cornish team-mates. The nearest game involves clubmates Brian Gosling (B) vs Oliver Wensley (partly obscured) Brian Gosling

The outcome can be best shown in these 2 tables.

KEY
Teams Pos Pts
D1 = Devon 1st team Bd. 1 1st
S2 = Somerset Bd. 2 2nd 7
C3 = Cornwall  Bd. 3 3rd 5
D2nd 4 = Devon 2nd team Bd. 4 4th
G5 = Gloucestershire  Bd. 5 5th 4
Bd Team White Grd Black Grd Team
1 C1 J. Menadue 191 ½ ½ N. Crickmore 214 D1
2 D2nd 1 J. Haynes 171 0 1 J. Rudd 215 S1
3 D2 W. Braun 203 1 0 M. Ashworth 192 G1
4 S2 F. Fernando 182 1 0 J. Hooker 178 C2
5 G2 J. Jenkins 185 1 0 T. Thynne 170 D2nd 2
6 C3 L. Retallick 174 ½ ½ P. Brooks 170 D2nd 3
7 S3 A. Footner 181 1 0 P. Meade 178 G3
8 D2nd 4 M. Shaw 169 0 1 G. Bolt 196 D3
9 G4 P. Kirby 177 ½ ½ D. Saqui 169 C4
10 D4 J. Underwood 192 ½ ½ A. Bedialauneta 159 S4
11 C5 M. Hassall 168 1 0 P. O’Neill 188 D5
12 G5 P. Masters 175 ½ ½ D. Freeman 156 S5
13 D2nd 5 D. Regis 166 0 1 R. Kneebone 164 C6
14 D6 S. Martin 186 1 0 R. Ashworth 161 G6
15 S6 R. Knight 156 ½ ½ V. Ramesh 164 D2nd 6
16 C7 T. Manton 163 0 1 M. Taylor 144 G7
17 D2nd 7 W. Ingham 163 0 1 J. Wheeler 185 D7
18 D8 B. Hewson 184 1 0 N. Senior 150 S7
19 S8 T. Woodward 150 ½ ½ R. Stephens 160 C8
20 G8 A. Gibson 139 0 1 M. Wilson 161 D2nd 8
21 C9 C. Sellwood 155 0 1 T. Paulden 183 D9
22 D2nd 9 C. Scott 160 1 0 A. Champion 147 S9
23 D10 C. Lowe 176 ½ ½ A. Richards 133 G9
24 S10 C. Purry 147 1 0 R. Smith 153 C10
25 G10 I. Blencowe 131 ½ ½ G. Body 157 D2nd 10
26 C11 G. Trudeau 148 1 0 P. Bending 122 G11
27 S11 T. Wallis 144 0 1 P. Hampton 172 D11
28 D2nd 11 T. Lundin 156 1 0 J. Morgan 146 C12
29 G12 D. Walton 109 0 1 N. Mills 133 S12
30 D12 O. Wensley 172 1 0 B. Gosling 154 D2nd 12

Paignton Congress Results (16.09.2017.)

The Paignton Congress finished last week with 61 cash prizes totalling £4,500, being awarded – too many to name all the winners here, though they are all on the keverelchess website. Here is a summary of the main winners.

Premier: 1st= Keith Arkell (Paignton) & Richard Bates (Hackney). 3rd Mike Waddington (Dorchester). Challengers (U-180) 1st K. Simpson (Mansfield). 2nd= Chris Lowe (Exeter); Robert Stern; Paul Jackson; Paul Jackson & Alex Rossiter (Bristol). Intermediate (U-150) 1st Ivor Annetts (Tiverton); 2nd= Terry Greenaway (Torquay) & Geoff Harrison (Gosforth). Minor (U-120) 1st= Tim Allen & Paul Errington. 3rd= Alan Davies (South Hams)  & Tim Crouch. 5 Round Morning sections. U-180 1st Roger Hutchings. U-135 1st Paul Doherty.

This game from the last round of the Morning tournament attracted a crowd during its fast finish. Notes based on those kindly supplied by the winner.

White: Martin Keeve. Black: Brian Gosling (E. Budleigh).

Dutch Defence [A85]

1.d4 e6 2.c4 f5 The Dutch Defence, a regular choice against 1.d4 in the 19th century, and still a sound tool in Black’s armoury. 3.Nc3 Nf6 4.Nf3 Bb4 5.g3 b6 6.Bg2 Bxc3+ 7.bxc3 Bb7 8.Ba3 Preventing castling pro tem. 8…Ne4 Attacking the doubled pawns. 9.Qb3 Nc6 10.Bb4 a5 11.Ba3 a4 12.Qc2 Na5 13.c5 Nc4 Black is establishing a strong centre. 14.Bb4 bxc5 15.dxc5 Bd5 Black is planning to block White’s dark-square bishop out of the game, but must first take care of his own bishop. 16.Rd1 c6 17.0–0 0–0 18.Nd4 Qg5 After some successful jousting on the queenside, Black turns his attention to the other wing where the rest of the game will be played out. 19.e3 Rf6 20.Qe2 Rg6 21.f4 Qf6 21…Nxg3 is probably better but more complicated and with time running out was rejected. 22.Bxe4 fxe4 23.f5 exf5 24.Rxf5 Qh4 25.Qf2 Qg4 26.Rf1 Threatening mate on f8. 26…h6 27.Rf4 Qg5 28.Kh1? White now offered a draw, which Black declined as he could foresee the strength of his next move. 28…Ne5! 29.Rf5 Qe7? Better was 29…Ng4 30.Qf4 Qxf4 31.R5xf4 Nxe3. 30.Qf4 Nd3 31.Qc7 Bxa2 Black takes time out to snaffle a pawn and  create a passed pawn. 32.Qb7 Re8 33.Qa7 Bb3 34.Kg2 34.Ba5 is the only chance for White. 34…Kh7 35.h3? White falters in severe time trouble. 35.Kg1 is better. 35…Qh4 36.g4 Rxg4+ Black can afford to play this, knowing he has a draw by repetition in hand. 37.hxg4 Qxg4+ 38.Kh2 Qh4+ 39.Kg2 Be6 winning the rook which has nowhere to go. 40.Qc7 Bxf5 41.Rxf5 And now the last rites are acted out. 41…Ne1+ 42.Kf1 Nd3 43.Qxd7 Only seconds to go, and White seeks counter-play, but it’s too little too late. 43…Qh1+ Forcing 44.Ke2 Qe1#.

In last week’s position from a game at Paignton White played 1.Na6+! giving Black the unwelcome choice of taking the knight or moving his king, but neither is good enough. If 1…PxN 2.Qb3+ and mates next move, or 1…Ka8 then 2.Nxc7+ wins the queen.

Here’s a position from Hall vs Brusey Exmouth 2007. White to play and win.

White to play and win by force

Exmouth’s Buzzing Start (13.09.2017.)

Exmouth Chess Club got their new season off to their traditional start of the dreaded  Buzzer Tournament. Key to the whole event is the battery-powered, home-made device that emits an unmistakable, unmissable warbling buzz every 10 seconds. Whoever’s move it is must move immediately the buzzer sounds, after which the opponent has 10 seconds thinking time.

It never fails to amaze and amuse, the extent to which those 10 seconds seem to vary, from the time one is playing the 1st 6 moves of one’s favourite opening to the final 6 moves or so, when fending off an attack that seems to come from all directions. They’re not the same thing at all.

In spite of the dreaded prospect of a whole evening of this mode of torture, 11 members were keen to get stuck in. In spite of the disparity in grades, the six lowest-graded players all beat someone of a higher grade, and all the top players lost a game, with the exception of FIDE Master Walter Braun, and even he dropped a half point before he got up a head of steam.

The final chart looked like this:

Name 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 Total
1 Bob Jones 138 X 0 1 1 1 ½ 0 1 0 ½ ½
2 Malcolm Belt 118 1 X 1 ½ 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
3 Ivor Grist 75 0 0 X 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1
4 Barbara Newcombe 83 0 ½ 0 X 0 ½ ½ 1 0 0 0
5 Chris Scott 150 0 1 1 X 1 1 0 ½ 0 0
6 Alan Dean 139 ½ 1 1 ½ 0 X 0 ½ 0 0 1
7 Mark Abbott 177 1 1 1 ½ 0 1 X 1 0 0 ½ 6
8 Simon Blake 102 0 1 1 0 1 ½ 0 X 0 0 0
9 Meyrick Shaw 186 1 1 1 1 ½ 1 1 1 X 0 ½
10 Walter Braun 190e ½ 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 X 1
11 Oliver Wensley 164 ½ 1 1 1 1 0 ½ 1 0 0 X 6

Walter Braun (nearest) & Malcom Belt deep in thought. In the backgound Barbara Newcombe plays Club President Mark Abbott and Oliver Wensley faces Simon Blake.

Scott vs Braun & Grist vs Belt, while Alan Dean watches developments.

Wensley vs Blake alongside Newcombe vs Abbott

Paignton Pics #1

Here are some scenes from the last day of the Congress…

Final Rd: Keith Arkell in action against Ashley Stewart, with David Gostelow taking Black against Steve Dilleigh next to them.

Final Rd: John Fraser vs Mike Waddington & Bates vs Goater. At one stage Fraser seemed to have his opponent completely tied up with all 3 kingside pieces unable to move, but Waddington eventually broke free and had 2 vs 2 pawns in which his proved the greater menace.

In the Challengers, Roger Hutchings failed to show up for his Bd. 1 game, so lost the chance to add another £300 to that won the day before in the Morning event. Here Chris Lowe plays Paul Jackson. and Trefor Thynne can be seen in action against Rossiter, while next to him is Bill Ingham playing Robert Stern.

Paignton Congress 2017 – Complete Prizelist

Here is the final prizelist of this year’s event, which totals nearly £4,500. The 0/2 prize is also called the Slow Starter prize, which was introduced to encourage those who have started the event disastrously, and to whom the prospect of an early return home might be coming increasingly attractive. It gives them something still to play for, instead of messing up the draw by withdrawing.

Arkell’s short Rd. 3 draw against his nearest rival, Richard Bates was, perhaps, predictable, but to be be fair he’d made 172 moves in his previous 2 games and, in any case, he was feeling (and looking) quite tired after a long series of back-to-back tournaments, taking in Dundee, Cardiff and Qatar, to name but three. And who wouldn’t.

Congratulations to all these winners.

Paignton  Congress  –  3rd – 9th September 2017
PRIZELIST
Premier
1st= Keith Arkell 2415 Halesowen £350
Richard Bates 2387 Hackney £350
3rd Mike Waddington 2080 Dorchester £200
4th= David Anderton 2093 Walsall Kipping 4 £33
Kevin Goater 2102 Weymouth 4 £33
Ashley Stewart 2127 Royston 4 £33
GP John Fraser 1870 Exeter University 4 £50
0/2 Ivan Myall 2000 Chelmsford 3 £20
Challengers (U-180)
1st Kevin Simpson 152 Mansfield 6 £300
2nd= Chris Lowe 176 Exeter 5 £75
Robert Stern 163 Albany 5 £75
Paul Jackson 162 Coulsdon 5 £75
Alex Rossiter 161 Bristol Cabot 5 £75
GP Yasser Tello 162 Wimbledon 4 £20
U-163 Colin Sellwood 155 Camborne 4 £20
U-154 Martin Page 152 Insurance £20
Jim Robertson 129 East Kilbride £20
0/2 Tim Spanton 169 Hastings £20
Intermediate (U-150)
1st Ivor Annetts 144 Tiverton £300
2nd= Terry Greenaway 141 Torquay 5 £150
Geoff Harrison 133 Gosforth 5 £150
GP Paul Doherty 126 Bolton 4 £10
U-132 Jeremy Brooks 121 Hampstead 4 £10
Gerald Parfett 119 Athenaeum 4 £10
0/2 Mark Stone 121 Pettswood 3 £20
Minor (U-120)
1st= Tim Allen 112 Battersea £250
Paul Errington 119 Bournemouth £250
3rd= Alan Davies 92 South Hams 5 £50
Tim Crouch 116 King’s Head 5 £50
GP Caroline Robson 105 Barnet 4 £30
GP George Phillips 96 B.C.A. 4 £15
U-98 Peter Carrick 96 Mid-Norton 4 £15
0/2 Reg Cox 84 Southampton 3 £10
Philip Gordon 119 B.C.A. 3 £10
5 Rd. Morning Sections
Boniface (U-180)
1st Roger Hutchings 174 Woodpushers £300
2nd= Richard Webster 175 Calderdale 4 £75
Clive Walley 164 Bath 4 £75
Alex Rossiter 161 Bristol Cabot 4 £75
Brian Gosling 154 East Budleigh 4 £75
GP Russell Goodfellow 159 Tunbridge Wells 3 £7.50
U-162 Alan Brusey 158 Newton Abbot 3 £7.50
Raymond Gamble 153 Derby 3 £7.50
Martin Keeve 161 Dresden 3 £7.50
U-146 John Shaddick 136 Basingstoke 3 £30
Thynne (U-135)
1st Paul Doherty 126 Bolton £300
2nd Tim Crouch 116 Kings Head 4 £200
3rd= David McGeeney 134 Bristol Cabot £33
Joseph Farrell 130 Metropolitan £33
Norbert Simmon 132 München £33
GP Stevo Ilic 101 Cowley £6
U-119 Clifford Peach 106 S. Hams £6
Barry Miles 115 Coulsdon £6
Graham Mill-Wilson 104 Plymouth £6
Susan Fraser 111 Darlington £6
0/2 Ken Ashby 97 S. Hams 2 £20
Richard Nash Blitz
1st John Fraser 5 £25
2nd Keith Arkell 4 £15
3rd= John Mercy 3 £2.50
David Costelow 3 £2.50
Kevin Goater 3 £2.50
Nigel Dennis 3 £2.50
Total prize money £4,458

Paignton Congress Rds. 3 & 4

Norman Tidy makes a move against Congress Organiser for many years, Alan Crickmore.

Rd. 4: Hazel Welch and Christine Constable both in deep thought.

Roger Waters (W) takes on Tony Tatam, who's enjoying the opportunity to swap the role of arbiter for that of player for a change.